Weekly Photo Challenge: Orange


I’ve not done one of these for a while so here we go. I originally thought I’d only have 4 or 5 but got a bit carried away, as you can see.  These photos cover 4 continents and about 3 years of my life.  Some of the hues come from nature, some are man made and others are the result of nature’s affect on man’s creations. I’m always drawn to photographing things with red tones, because red is a favourite colour of mine, but I’d not realised I had so may different oranges until I started going through to select some.

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Art of Covers


I know you aren’t meant to judge a book by it’s cover, but we do, of course we do.  If I see a book with a plain black cover, stern white font and one item lit up with one colour tone then I’m going to avoid it because it’s either 50 Shades of Grey or one of it’s many knock-offs.  I’m never going to read any of them.  If it’s all ink with slightly curled font in a pastel tone, perhaps with cupcakes or stars around it, then that’s probably not a book for me either.

I love collections of anything grouped together as a subject for a picture, but particularly book or album covers.  I like the differences and similarities in the layout, font, colour choices, images, sizing and all that sort of thing.  And so I take pictures of these groupings and some of these can be seen below:

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Weekly Photo Challenge: Cover Art


The brief for this weekly photo challenge is to think about an image that could be used as a cover for something – a magazine, an album, a book perhaps.

I’d like to make an album at some point.  I know what the cover is going to be like, I’ve got it in my head, but I don’t want to reveal that yet.  I’ve started writing a book and I’ve got an idea of what the cover of that might be, even if I’ve got no title and no definite conclusion to the story.  So I’m not going to reveal that yet.

At some stage I’m going to put together my photo journal of Felt Sherlock‘s travels and I think this should be the cover:IMG_8072

Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside


Weekly Photo Challenge: Inside

From the outside news reports the protests in Bangkok in February 2014 were more like riots, clashes with the police and sadly people died.

Inside, this was not the case everywhere. The protests were spread across a large area, with tents, music, food, I was given free water and invited to write on the pro-democracy walls.

A ten minute walk into the protest site I found these children dancing.

Wade in the water – goldfish shoals, nibbling at my toes


My trip to Laos was brief and, on the whole, brilliant, barring the scam fiasco of the last day in Luang Prabang.

I wish I’d managed to see a little more of the country and spend more time with the locals, but I didn’t quite realise how much time I’d spent in Thailand, not really doing much.  But there you are, you learn and I’ll be planning the rest of the trip a little bit more than just ‘ah I’ll go there next…’

The main impressions that I have of Laos are:

  • mountains, mountains and more mountains.  Covered in forests and jungle, long twisting roads passing through linear villages with small children walking to school, even smaller children playing by the side of the road.
  • the misty vistas that ideas of Asia bring to mind.   Mountains looking like torn tissue paper, fading off into the distance.
  • A father having a waterfight with his son as we drove past, the child giggling in delight.
  • Friendliness of strangers (mostly) offering directions, tips for good food options.
  • Resourcefullness and hard work ethic.  People were selling items made from the shells dropped during the ‘American War‘, flowers and peace signs shaped from the metal and destruction brought by American bombers.  I had no idea that Laos had been affected so badly, I’ll certainly be reading more about it in the coming weeks.
  • Water, water everywhere…

In Luang Prabang the main feature of the surrounding landscape is the Mekong River, winding it’s way past the city, conjoining  with the Nam Khan and in the evening you can sit and watch the sunset over the river.

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Oops I did it again…


For the second time I’ve submitted a photo to the Guardian reader’s pictures section and for the second time I’ve been picked for the website.  I’ve not been in the top three in the paper yet, but I’ll keep going.  If you want to take a look it’s here, the fisherman in the ‘Delight’ topic.

 

I don’t think my next entry will get picked for ‘Shimmer’, but it’s worth entering to see if it gets in.  

 

Apologies for the lack of updates, I keep meaning to do part two of my Serengeti blog – the Ngorogoro crater calls – but the internet here has been rubbish, I’ve had parent’s evenings and I hosted a party so, I’ve been busy. 

 

It should be on its way, along with one of the best pictures I’ve ever taken (not that tricky) as will another to mark my Dad’s 65th birthday that never was. 

 

Please keep checking back! 

In the kitchen, the mighty kitchen, the lino sleeps tonight…


Now that I’m entering my final months of this stint in Tanzania there are so many things that I want to do but don’t have the funds for at the moment. I’m almost half way through our Easter holiday and I was hoping to go to Gombe Stream National Park to visit the chimpanzees but the ‘death money’ hasn’t come through, so I’ll se staying in Mwanza. I would love to go white water rafting in Uganda, or to see the gorillas in Rwanda, take the train from Dar es Salaam to Zambia to see Victoria Falls, but it’s not going to happen on this trip. Even if I stayed on for a further year I don’t think I’d have enough cash and time to do all of these things so there’s no point in getting annoyed and feeling like I’ve missed out.

There is plenty that I have done in the 6 months that I’ve actually been here, however. I‘ve been to Zanzibar, to Tanga and Pangani on the Tanzanian Swahili Coast. I have driven through ancient landscapes down to Shinyanga, across to Arusha, seen Mount Kilimanjaro, up across the border into Kenya. I’ve fed giraffes, been tickled by an orphaned elephant, snorkelled in the Indian Ocean, met fishermen and Maasai, been stupidly sunburnt (even in the shade), eaten fresh octopus and fish straight from the ocean. I’ve been to one of the most important archaeological sites in Kenya and watched monkeys play for half an hour. And last weekend I went to the Serengeti.

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